Move Your Body: Engaging Museum Visitors with Human-Data Interaction

Milka Trajkova, A'Aeshah Alhakamy, Francesco Cafaro, Rashmi Mallappa, Sreekanth R. Kankara

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Museums have embraced embodied interaction: its novelty generates buzz and excitement among their patrons, and it has enormous educational potential. Human-Data Interaction (HDI) is a class of embodied interactions that enables people to explore large sets of data using interactive visualizations that users control with gestures and body movements. In museums, however, HDI installations have no utility if visitors do not engage with them. In this paper, we present a quasi-experimental study that investigates how different ways of representing the user ("mode type") next-to a data visualization alters the way in which people engage with a HDI system. We consider four mode types: Avatar, skeleton, camera overlay, and control. Our findings indicate that the mode type impacts the number of visitors that interact with the installation, the gestures that people do, and the amount of time that visitors spend observing the data on display and interacting with the system.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCHI 2020 - Proceedings of the 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
ISBN (Electronic)9781450367080
DOIs
StatePublished - 21 Apr 2020
Externally publishedYes
Event2020 ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2020 - Honolulu, United States
Duration: 25 Apr 202030 Apr 2020

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings

Conference

Conference2020 ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2020
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityHonolulu
Period25/04/2030/04/20

Keywords

  • embodied interaction
  • human-data interaction
  • informal learning
  • museums
  • public displays

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